Dr. Daniel W. Lund is an Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Business (a partner program with Duke University's Fuqua School of Business), Nazarbayev University in Astana, Kazakhstan.

(See my biography page for more information).


Publications:
Young Chinese Entrepreneurs in Australia: Migrant Networks in a New Land

This paper examines the nature of networks and how they are used for business purposes by young migrant Chinese entrepreneurs in Australia.

Article: Print

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Article: Electronic

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New Entrepreneurs in Australia: Young Overseas Chinese Business Networks

The phenomenon of young Overseas Chinese entrepreneurs and the factors which influence their use of business networks in Australia is examined.

Article: Print

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Article: Electronic

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Organisational Effectiveness of Immigrant Staff in Australia: Sustaining a Culturally Diverse Workforce

Qualitative exploration of the adjustment processes of immigrant newcomer staff members in Australia and how these processes influence organisational effectiveness.

Article: Print

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Article: Electronic

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Spousal Perspective of Expatriate Family Adjustment

The study explores the phenomenon of western expatriate family adjustment in non-western country assignments, from the perspective of ten accompanying expatriate spouses with children.

Article: Print

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Article: Electronic

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Immigrant Adjustment: The Importance of Humor

The importance of humor is examined as it relates to the new-country and new-workplace adjustment experiences of a group of diverse immigrants.

Article: Print

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Expatriate Managers in China: Defining What it is to be “Effective”

Perceptions of managerial effectiveness in China are examined amongst a group of Western expatriate managers working in China. The similarities and differences between their perceptions are discussed.

Article: Print

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Article: Electronic

Free Download
Intercultural Research and the Interviewee-Interviewer Relationship: The Benefit of Being “Different”

The interviewee-interviewer relationship in intercultural research is examined as it relates to the co-generation of rich data. Theoretical and practical implications of intercultural differences between interviewees and interviewers are examined.

Article: Print

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Article: Electronic

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